What themes are being overused? Vampires and zombies are everywhere, and now soft-core erotica is hot, but trends come and go. The challenge is to write something that will outlast the trends and stand up over time.

 

  • Do you see ebooks threatening traditional publishing? It’s just another option. Self-publishing is no more a threat than YouTube is to blockbuster theatrical releases. There are more options for audiences, but it’s also easier than ever to get a lot of content as well as create and distribute it.
  • Do you prefer to read established authors or debut authors? How do you choose which ones to read? I read a lot of newer, indie authors but in general I like the tried-and-true favorites. There is still something to be said for the quality of a traditionally published book–if nothing else, at least the author had to jump through competitive hoops to get attention, and publishers still employ editors.

 

  • Do you have a target each day? As a self-publisher, I am in the business of selling books. So I have both a job and an art. Writing is for fun, but I have to sell the books if I want to write more. So my life is a mix of creation and promotion. Fortunately, I enjoy all aspects of writing as an art and business.

 

  • After so many books, how do you keep them unique? Every book has its on life, its own season, its own arc–usually superimposed over whatever is happening in the writer’s own life and head during that time.

 

  • Do you remember the first time you saw your book in a shop? No. I never felt that sort of thrill, although I did enjoy opening the first box of printed books. By the time a book is published, it is usually long after the emotional act of creating it, and I’d rather focus on the work in progress.
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