Tag Archive: guest author


My good friend, Laurence O’Bryan is reknowned as a puzzle master. Read his first book ‘The Istanbul Puzzle’ to find out. Recently I asked Laurence (or LOB as I call him) about using puzzles within his novels. He offered to write my a guest post about it.

In my mystery novel, The Istanbul Puzzle, Sean and Isabel discover a clue early on, a photograph of a mosaic. The mosaic is similar to the iconic Christian images of the Virgin & Child that are so well known all around the world. Here is an example from the Louvre museum in Paris. This is a copper plate believed to have been “taken” from Constantinople in 1204. “Looted” is probably what they meant:

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Stephen C. Ormsby has jumped to a new blog.
This is where you will find Author Interviews, Reviews and
updates for Stephen and his works as well.

Please do not fear – I still have lots of Interviews to go
and have more coming in each and every day,
but I have combined my efforts with Marieke, my beautiful
cover designing photographer muse.

Please join us at http://IdeasCaptured.com/Blog.
We also have a new Twitter name of @IdeasCaptured,
which I urge you to follow as well.

There you will also be able to view the wonderful photos Marieke has taken as well.

Over time, we will migrate all the Author Interviews and Reviews
on the IdeasCaptured blog, so they will not be lost!

What themes are being overused? Vampires and zombies are everywhere, and now soft-core erotica is hot, but trends come and go. The challenge is to write something that will outlast the trends and stand up over time.

 

  • Do you see ebooks threatening traditional publishing? It’s just another option. Self-publishing is no more a threat than YouTube is to blockbuster theatrical releases. There are more options for audiences, but it’s also easier than ever to get a lot of content as well as create and distribute it.
  • Do you prefer to read established authors or debut authors? How do you choose which ones to read? I read a lot of newer, indie authors but in general I like the tried-and-true favorites. There is still something to be said for the quality of a traditionally published book–if nothing else, at least the author had to jump through competitive hoops to get attention, and publishers still employ editors.

 

  • Do you have a target each day? As a self-publisher, I am in the business of selling books. So I have both a job and an art. Writing is for fun, but I have to sell the books if I want to write more. So my life is a mix of creation and promotion. Fortunately, I enjoy all aspects of writing as an art and business.

 

  • After so many books, how do you keep them unique? Every book has its on life, its own season, its own arc–usually superimposed over whatever is happening in the writer’s own life and head during that time.

 

  • Do you remember the first time you saw your book in a shop? No. I never felt that sort of thrill, although I did enjoy opening the first box of printed books. By the time a book is published, it is usually long after the emotional act of creating it, and I’d rather focus on the work in progress.

I discovered Sean McMullen with the release of his Greatwinter Trilogy – Souls in the Great Machine. This post-apocalyptic novel opens my eyes to this genre, and I tore through it, quickly going to look for more. I was lucky enough that Sean had a back catalogue another couple of books.

From thereon, I was hooked on Sean’s writing; his style and his ideas. Sean followed Greatwinter with The Moonworlds Saga. He has also collected 6 Ditmar awards and 3 Aurealis awards along the way. Of late, Sean has been a bit quiet, but I know something new will not be too far away.

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Robert Vardeman (who is sometimes called Vardebob) is a living legend in fantasy and science fiction.  I am going to borrow directly from Wikipedia for this:

Vardeman’s fantasy series include the War of Powers (6 volumes co-authored with Victor Milan), Cenotaph Road (6 volumes), The Swords of Raemllyn (9 volumes co-authored with Geo. W. Proctor), The Jade Demons (4 books), The Keys to Paradise trilogy, The Demon Crown trilogy, and a British-published trilogy called “The Accursed.” Vardeman is currently involved in the novelizations of the fantasy game series, God of War.

Vardeman’s science fiction works include the Weapons of Chaos trilogy, 3 published books in the “Masters of Space” series, the Biowarriors trilogy, and the stand-alone novels “The Sandcats of Rhyl,” “Road to the Stars,” and “Ancient Heavens.” The 1991 techno-thriller “Death Fall” is a related novel, although works set in a contemporary setting are often not categorized as science fiction.

Recently, I grabbed Bob’s “The Sandcast of Phyl” when he offered it for free as an ebook.  We got to talking…

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I am a ghost writer, and this is a very interesting job for a freelance professional writer. I started out freelancing in 1980, working mostly as a home health care aide for the disabled as my day job, and this gave me some material to write about in the Seattle area. As of 2003, I began a ghost writing and editing business on the Internet under the name Rainbow Writing, Inc., which I changed to Ghost Writer, Inc. in 2011. Nowadays I’m semi-retired, and I send out work to my team of ghost writers, editors, marketers and promoters of books, screenplays and other written works.

So I’m kept pretty busy by my job, sometimes as a ghost writer for certain projects, sometimes as a ghost writing service for the bulk of my writing projects. It’s a bit like being Sherlock Holmes – I only need to take on the “interesting cases” that come in. My role is usually that of an overseer or go-between when it comes to sending out work to my players/ghost writers, but I have to call on all my skills gained over the years when it comes to ghost writing and editing, whether it’s me or someone else who is doing the jobs for our incoming ghost writer clients.

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Kurt Vonnegut: Letters

Kurt Vonnegut (edited and with an introduction by Dan Wakefield)
Random House Publishing Group
      Delacorte Press

Pub Date                Oct 30 2012

Description
This extraordinary collection of personal correspondence has all the hallmarks of Kurt Vonnegut’s fiction. Written over a sixty-year period, these letters, the vast majority of them never before published, are funny, moving, and full of the same uncanny wisdom that has endeared his work to readers worldwide.Included in this comprehensive volume: the letter a twenty-two-year-old Vonnegut wrote home immediately upon being freed from a German POW camp, recounting the ghastly firebombing of Dresden that would be the subject of his masterpiece Slaughterhouse-Five;wry dispatches from Vonnegut’s years as a struggling writer slowly finding an audience and then dealing with sudden international fame in middle age; righteously angry letters of protest to local school boards that tried to ban his work; intimate remembrances penned to high school classmates, fellow veterans, friends, and family; and letters of commiseration and encouragement to such contemporaries as Gail Godwin, G�nter Grass, and Bernard Malamud.

Embers at Galdrilene has undergone a huge transformation! It now sports a beautifully  redesigned front cover, spine and back cover. It also has an awesome custom designed interior and has been professionally edited. All thanks to the incredible team at Blue Harvest Creative. And as an added bonus, when you read the final page of Embers at Galdrilene, you’ll get an exciting sneak peek for the prologue Tears of War, the second book in the Dragon’s Call series.

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Embers at Galdrilene has undergone a huge transformation! It now sports a beautifully  redesigned front cover, spine and back cover. It also has an awesome custom designed interior and has been professionally edited. All thanks to the incredible team at Blue Harvest Creative. And as an added bonus, when you read the final page of Embers at Galdrilene, you’ll get an exciting sneak peek for the prologue Tears of War, the second book in the Dragon’s Call series.

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Tony Shillitoe burst onto the Australian fantasy scene with the Andrakis Trilogy beginning in 1992.  As the story, he was convinced by a friend to send a sample to a publisher even though he had only about 10 chapters written.  He didn’t hold much hope for it being seen, as he says that only about 0.1% of manuscripts get published.  Much to his surprise his was accepted.  A little bit of amazement and a lot of shock and Tony had himself a trilogy.

He then went on to write ‘The Last Wizard’, which was shortlisted for the Aurealis Award for best fantasy novel.  It would then be some 7 years before he would return to fantasy with the Ashuak Chronicles.  In 2006 Shillitoe released the first novel in a new fantasy series, the Dreaming in Amber quartet.

But since then he has been very quiet.  The great news is that there is something new coming.  Something very new, and I cannot wait for it.  Until then Tony agreed to do this little interview with me.

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